Tag Archive: motorola


Although there are plenty of online radio apps on the Android market, nothing can really replace an old fashioned FM radio. If you own a Droid 2, you can thank XDA for yet again figuring out how to implement one just by following a couple simple steps. As with most things of this nature, a little command line work is necessary, but beyond that it’s easy as pie. Just make sure before you try that your Droid 2 is rooted or else this will end in failure. You’ll be jamming to your local stations in no time.

Advertisements

Today, Walmart announced that it would be launching a self-branded wireless service titled Walmart Family Mobile. The new wireless service will utilize T-Mobile USA’s GSM network and will offer unlimited calling and texting for $45 per month; additional unlimited lines can be added for $25. Data usage can be pre-purchased at the rate of $40 per gigabyte and unused megabytes roll over from month to month. The Motorola Cliq XT will be Family Mobile’s high-end offering at launch ($249) and the cheapest offering will be a $30 set from Nokia. Walmart also sells pre-paid wireless options from Verizon Wireless (Straight Talk) and Sprint Nextel (Common Cents). The service will launch next week in Walmart retail stores across the country.

Recipe for win — 1 part newest Android phone, the Droid 2, and 1 part Star Wars’ most memorable character, R2-D2. Mix well, prepare for the onslaught of people like me who will do just about anything to throw our money at you so we can have one. And to tease us until we explode, Verizon has gone live with the R2-Droid2 teaser page.

Taking a cue from the X, it looks like this page has some locked content as well. The site says to follow R2 on Twitter to unlock details, @droidlanding. Why would anyone want to worry about unlocking content on a phone’s launch page? Two words — Jedi Training. We’re following, you guys follow too, and whoever gets portions unlocked first has to tell the rest of us — deal? [Verizon]

A Motorola support forum response about issues involving Exchange 2003 email problems on the Droid X has actually yielded something far more juicy: an updated window for the Froyo upgrade’s release. Promised since the phone’s initial launch, Moto’s now saying that the new build is “scheduled for deployment by early September,” so barring a miracle, we can probably toss out those dreams of getting it by late August — and we can certainly forget the rumors that it had already started going out. Clearly we’d like it sooner rather than later, but hey, if they’re hard at work squashing bugs as we speak, more power to ’em — we’re all for stable releases.

motorola-i1-sprint

After launching on Boost Mobile last month, the Motorola i1 is hitting Sprint on July 25th. The touchscreen offering will be the first Android handset with Nextel Direct Connect and the first Direct Connect handset with a 5 megapixel camera and video recording. This rugged handset is sure to please the construction crowd with its: 3.1″ HVGA display, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.0, a 2.5mm headphone jack, military ruggedness for dust, shock, vibration and rain, and Android 1.5 — not to mention the suite of available business tracking and job workflow applications including Xora mobile workforce management tools, TeleNavTrack, and Sprint Mobile Locator. The i1 will launch through direct ship, business sales, telesales, and web sales next Sunday and will hit the remaining channels on August 8th for a reasonable $149.99 after a $50 mail-in rebate and two-year commitment.

droidX bootloader isn't going to blow up

Motorola has come clean about the eFUSE questions, and we’re all relieved to hear the Droid Xwon’t blow up if you try to hack it.  I can imagine that my questions were just a drop in the bucket and Moto had a stack of e-mail that they couldn’t ignore.  They reached out to Engadget with the following, saying (among other things):

“The Droid X and a majority of Android consumer devices on the market today have a secured bootloader. In reference specifically to eFuse, the technology is not loaded with the purpose of preventing a consumer device from functioning, but rather ensuring for the user that the device only runs on updated and tested versions of software. If a device attempts to boot with unapproved software, it will go into recovery mode, and can re-boot once approved software is re-installed.”

The good news is that your shiny new Droid X won’t go boom if you try to hack it.  The bad news is that Motorola has placed another layer of security in an attempt to thwart people from customizing or modifying their Android phone.  One that I’m sure has a big old target on it now — the biggest challenge draws the brightest people 🙂  I hope Moto’s new trick doesn’t work, and that they change their ways in the future, but I’m not expecting it.  In the end, all I really wanted was an official statement from Motorola, and they delivered.  Now it’s up to us to show them the error of their ways. Check out the source for the full quote. [Engadget]

When the Moto Backflip launched we were a wee bit miffed that AT&T stuffed its ROM with what our esteemed Chris Ziegler referred to as “unremovable crapware.” But, even more annoying was the handset being locked down to only accept apps installed via the Android Market, preventing users from the wealth of other goodies floating around these great internets. A few months on the situation is still the same for the HTC Aria and the company is responding directly to criticism with a statement that indicates it’s all in your best interests:

AT&T selected Android Market as the exclusive source for applications because it forces developers to be accountable for the apps they submit. If the Android community has issues with an app, the app can be flagged and removed. This minimizes the risk of malicious apps harming customers and provides more protection to the customer’s private data stored on the phone.

There, don’t you feel safer now?

Droid Froyo updates

So the Droid X isn’t launching with Android 2.2. That’s a bummer. And and it’s not going to be available until “late summer.” That’s what we were told at Verizon’s Droid X event, and it’s what Verizon’s saying in the internal document you see above. But the doc also says that the original Droid will get Android 2.2 (and Flash 10.1) sometime in July, which kind of goes against what we (are pretty sure we) heard today — that the Droid and Droid X would get their updates together. But let’s not look a gift horse in the mouth, m’kay? We’ll take some Froyo for the Droid just as soon as we can get it. Big props to you know who.