Tag Archive: droid


Although there are plenty of online radio apps on the Android market, nothing can really replace an old fashioned FM radio. If you own a Droid 2, you can thank XDA for yet again figuring out how to implement one just by following a couple simple steps. As with most things of this nature, a little command line work is necessary, but beyond that it’s easy as pie. Just make sure before you try that your Droid 2 is rooted or else this will end in failure. You’ll be jamming to your local stations in no time.

The Droid Incredible by HTC is, well — nothing short of incredible (sorry, I just had to). What’s not incredible is the meager battery life, with the stock 1300mAh power plant. That’s where the 2150 mAh extended battery for the Droid Incredible comes in, getting you through the day — and then some. Full review and pictures after the break.

The first question everyone always ask about these extended batteries goes a little like this: “Is it really that much bigger, and if so, does it make it ugly.” The answer to that first part of the question is yes — it does make it feel slightly bulkier. The answer to that second part of the question is no — it does not make it ugly per se.

Being that the battery is a bit thicker than the stock 1300mAh, it requires a new door for the back. HTC keeps the same presentation and manufacturing quality as the smaller backing. It still sports the contours and grooves that Verizon says was designed in line with a “sports car” look and feel; all while the door snaps into place with ease. The door also still provides that soft-touch feel that comes stock on all Incredible phones.

Moving on to the numbers. After the aesthics question is answered, the next question usually goes a little like this: “How long does the battery last?” Good question! When reviewing this battery, I really wanted to push it to the max. I wanted to see how long, quantitatively speaking, HTC’s battery could go. The average life before I needed to charge this battery was 19 hours after heavy usage. Before, with the stock battery, I was only getting about 8 hours of heavy use. Heavy usage includes: GPS enabled Foursquare check-ins, constant Gmail and Yahoo! Mail exchange, web browsing, SMS, MMS, an addiction to Asphalt 4, frequent auto-sync to Twitter and Facebook, always on 3G, and the brightness turned on a bit higher than the medium setting.

I could sit here and list all all the other pointless things I do on my phone on a daily basis, but all you need to know is that if you don’t mind a little extra weight — this battery gives you the best experience on the Droid Incredible. It may even give you two days worth, depending how hard you’re pushing your Incredible.

The battery is available in the Android Central Store for $64.95. Scoop it up!

It’s only been three days since Froyo for the Droid X leaked and now Motorola is pressuring sites to remove the download. The reasoning for this hasn’t been made clear but if you were hoping to get an early helping of Froyo on your Droid X you better get to work now, finding the leak will only get harder from here on out.

[via Engadget]

First hands-on impressions of the new Motorola DROID 2

The DROID 2 has landed!  We’re pretty sure that there’s a few other blogs who have used this phrase today, but that doesn’t take away from the fact that the Motorola DROID 2 is now available at Verizon Wireless stores across the country.  Fortunately, our friends over at Verizon thought it would be nice to send us a demo unit to play around with for a few days.  Since the DROID 2 has been in our possession for a few hours, we can give you a quick idea of what to expect.

On the outside, the Motorola DROID 2 is pretty much identical to the original DROID.  The main differentiator between the original DROID and the new DROID 2 is the brushed aluminum bevel which now covers the entire front of the handset.  The back of the phone is now a dark midnight blue with silver highlights which replaces the black finish with gold highlights on the first DROID.

Sliding the screen up reveals the DROID 2’s four row QWERTY keyboard.  At first glance, the keyboard looks pretty familiar.  Motorola has kept the same concept as before, though they have stretched the keys which will give users a better typing experience.  The extra space was gained by removing the d-pad and incorporating directional keys into the keyboard layout.

The real changes are noticed when you actually turn the DROID 2 on.  The DROID 2 is the first phone from Motorola to launch with Android 2.2.  If you were hoping that Motorola would ship the new phone without their custom UI, you’re going to be greatly disappointed.  Just like the DROID X, the DROID 2 features a mutated version of MotoBLUR.  From what we can tell, the only UI difference between the D-X and D-2 is the unlock screen.

Once we have time to play around with the DROID 2 a little more, we’ll be sure to share our findings.  We’re pretty sure at least a handful of you picked up the DROID 2 today.  Let us know what you think of the handset so far.

A Motorola support forum response about issues involving Exchange 2003 email problems on the Droid X has actually yielded something far more juicy: an updated window for the Froyo upgrade’s release. Promised since the phone’s initial launch, Moto’s now saying that the new build is “scheduled for deployment by early September,” so barring a miracle, we can probably toss out those dreams of getting it by late August — and we can certainly forget the rumors that it had already started going out. Clearly we’d like it sooner rather than later, but hey, if they’re hard at work squashing bugs as we speak, more power to ’em — we’re all for stable releases.

Droid Froyo updates

So the Droid X isn’t launching with Android 2.2. That’s a bummer. And and it’s not going to be available until “late summer.” That’s what we were told at Verizon’s Droid X event, and it’s what Verizon’s saying in the internal document you see above. But the doc also says that the original Droid will get Android 2.2 (and Flash 10.1) sometime in July, which kind of goes against what we (are pretty sure we) heard today — that the Droid and Droid X would get their updates together. But let’s not look a gift horse in the mouth, m’kay? We’ll take some Froyo for the Droid just as soon as we can get it. Big props to you know who.

Motorola Droid X: Subtle Like an Asteroid

Motorola’s Droid X is real. Really, really giant. And it looks like video is going to be how Verizon pushes the 4.3-inch screen: VCAST, a Blockbuster download service, HDMI out and DLNA compatibility. Did I mention it’s gigantinormous?

Motorola Droid X: Subtle Like an Asteroid

What an odd phone. It’s tapered but in a crazy way: The bottom is super skinny, the body slowly growing growing thicker until it’s topped by a fat head. (Which gives you something meaty to grab in your pocket, making it surprisingly easy to whip out.) The effect is that while it’s larger than the Evo, it feels like a smaller phone. The screen is notably sharper than the similarly big-boned Evo, I should add (check it out in the gallery).

It’s running a brand new version of Motoblur on top of Android 2.1, which seems a bit more integrated into the OS than the old version, rather than slathered on top like colorful, half-hardened rubber cement. That said, some of the interface stuff is kind of confusing. When you boot up the phone, seven screens are stacked with widgets, which bogs down the phone enough to result in some definite chop if you’re zipping around a lot (though overall, the speed seems decent at first glance). I don’t know why they’d assault people with 6,000 widgets the minute they turn on the phone. How does that make Android friendlier?

I’m already in love the true multitouch keyboard, which might be the best Android now. It’s huge, and clean (HTC’s massive keyboard is noisy). A neat point is the way you select text—it’s iPhone-y, with a zoomed in rectangle when you press and hold.

Motorola Droid X: Subtle Like an Asteroid

It has built-in camera effects to go along with the 8MP camera, and more extensive settings than the default Android 2.1 setup. Which, click here for a full-sized sample of the shot above. The DLNA stuff seemed to work pretty well in the little demo they had set up—the 720p video they played, taken from the Droid X, looked okay, not amazing (the jello effect was noticeable).

It doesn’t have 4G, but even Google’s Andy Rubin called this the new “platinum” Android device. He might be right.

Some specs and details:

• 4.3-inch, 854×480 display
• 8 megapixel camera
• 720p video recording
• 1GHz TI OMAP processor (successor to the chip in the original Droid)
• 8GB internal storage (plus microSD)
• HDMI out
• 720p video
• true multitouch keyboard, with pre-loaded Swype
• Wi-Fi hotspot powers for up to 5 devices.
• “High performance diversity antennas” for call quality
• Battery life comparable to the original Droid
• 3, yes three mics: for video and noise suppression
• It’s not getting Android 2.2 until “late summer” (boooo!)
• It’s $200 after $100 mail-in rebate when it comes out July 15—the bonus is that they’re pulling an AT&T, so anybody eligible for an upgrade anytime in 2010 can upgrade immediately.
• Standard unlimited $30 data plan; $20 extra for mobile hotspot powers which comes with 2GB. Another $20 nets you an extra 2GB of data a month.

The full press release, BTW:

BASKING RIDGE, N.J., and LIBERTYVILLE, Ill., June 23 /PRNewswire/ — Verizon Wireless, the company with the nation’s largest and most reliable wireless 3G network, and Motorola, Inc. (NYSE: MOT), a pioneer in the mobile industry, today unveiled DROID X by Motorola. DROID X does more with ultra high-speed Web browsing; a fast 1GHz processor; 3G Mobile HotSpot capabilities; loads of memory; intuitive social messaging; Adobe® Flash® Player 10.1 ready; and access to Android Market™, which has more than 65,000 applications, along with a host of unique Verizon Wireless applications such as NFL Mobile, Skype mobile™, V CAST Video, EA Need for Speed Shift™ and more.

“Nine months ago, we made a commitment to our customers to bring the openness of Android to the Verizon Wireless network,” said John Stratton, executive vice president and chief marketing officer for Verizon Wireless. “Since then, we have introduced the top-selling Android phone in the marketplace today — the DROID by Motorola. DROID X takes that commitment to another level with exclusive content, faster processing speeds, and, of course, the reliability of our network.”

Sanjay Jha, co-chief executive officer of Motorola and chief executive officer of Motorola Mobile Devices and Home business added, “Motorola designed DROID X to push the extreme limits of Android innovation, and enable you to do even more with your mobile device. We are breaking down barriers so that you can experience the Web the way it was meant to be and create, share and view content like never before, either in your hand or in your home. Enterprise users will also find DROID X appealing with features including push e-mail and live widgets for e-mail and calendar updates.”

DROID X gives customers a 4.3-inch high-resolution screen for viewing the latest movies and video from BLOCKBUSTER On Demand® presented by V CAST Video, the newest addition to the Verizon Wireless V CAST application, which also includes access to favorite TV shows. The DROID X video capabilities let customers capture spontaneous fun, combining a dual-flash, 8-megapixel camera, HD camcorder, as well as DLNA and HDMI connectivity to download, stream and share personal HD content.

DROID X customers will also receive Android 2.2 and Adobe Flash Player 10.1 with an over-the-air update in the latter half of the summer. With the update, the Flash Player will allow mobile users to experience hundreds of sites with rich applications and content inside the browser, including games, animations, rich Internet applications (RIAs), data presentations and visualizations, ecommerce, music, video, audio and more.

“It has been an exciting time for Android momentum and global consumer adoption since the announcement of DROID by Motorola nine months ago,” said Andy Rubin, vice president of engineering for Google. “There are 160,000 new Android-powered devices activated daily and Android Market has grown to over 65,000 applications. Plus later this summer, Verizon Wireless and Motorola will update all the DROID by Motorola phones to the latest 2.2 software. For customers, this means great new features and improved browser performance. For developers, this will provide new tools such as cloud-to-device messaging and enhanced enterprise functionality.”

“We are excited about full Flash support coming to the DROID X and other devices from Motorola,” said Shantanu Narayen, president and chief executive officer of Adobe. “Flash Player 10.1, which is one of Adobe’s most anticipated releases ever, has been redesigned from the ground up to deliver the kind of highly engaging experiences that consumers now expect from their mobile devices.”

Once updated to Android 2.2, business customers will find DROID X offers the features that turn the device into a workhorse with support for both Exchange and Gmail™ for business. Corporate users can enjoy push delivery of e-mail; live widgets that stream messages to the home screen; filter widgets to differentiate work and home e-mail; corporate directory and Global look-up along with a unified calendar for Enterprise and sync with Google Calendar™. Security protocols allow remote password control and wipe via Exchange server.

Pricing and Availability
DROID X by Motorola will be available at http://www.verizonwireless.com and in Verizon Wireless Communications Stores beginning July 15 for $199.99 after a $100 mail-in rebate with a new two-year customer agreement. Customers will receive the mail-in rebate in the form of a debit card; upon receipt, customers may use the card as cash anywhere debit cards are accepted. In addition to subscribing to a Nationwide Talk plan or a Nationwide Talk & Text plan, customers will also need to subscribe to an Email and Web for Smartphone plan. Nationwide Talk plans begin at $39.99 monthly access. Email and Web for Smartphone plans start at $29.99 for unlimited monthly access.

Customers can add the optional 3G Mobile Hotspot service to their DROID X for $20 per month. The 3G Mobile Hotspot allows customers to turn the phone into a wireless modem for up to five compatible Wi-Fi devices. In addition, current Verizon Wireless customers who have contracts ending by December 31, 2010, can upgrade to any smartphone, including DROID X, without penalty.

For more information on DROID X by Motorola, go to http://phones.verizonwireless.com/droid/x/. For information about Verizon Wireless products and services, visit a Verizon Wireless Communications Store, call 1-800-2 JOIN IN or go to http://www.verizonwireless.com.